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Museum Musings

Guest Blog by Andrea Kirsh

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I met Rob Levin, NMAJH’s Community Relations Liaison, at the opening of an art exhibition at City Hall. After our short conversation, I said I’d like to have my Rutgers Camden undergraduate students in museum studies program speak with him. I arrange for them to meet several museum professionals during the semester, and sometimes select colleagues selfishly, because I want to learn more about the responsibilities of their positions. What does it mean to direct visitor services, manage exhibitions, or in Rob’s case, liaise with the community?

We arranged to meet at the museum, but none of us were entirely prepared for Rob – which was just what he intended. He approached the group with a query, which he had to repeat several times – in Portuguese! When we realized that he was, indeed, in the right place and not a lost member of the public, and after we had each given an awkward response to his greeting, he switched to English and asked us to account for our reactions to our introduction. As with all good teachers, he had demonstrated what his job involves, rather than describe it.

None of the students were Jewish, and as such, they represented part of the community that the NMAJH and Rob, in particular, work to engage. And very successfully so. They were uniformly very enthusiastic about the visit. They found the exhibitions interesting and clearly laid out, and particularly responded to the numerous interactive aspects, even when the interactions were nothing more sophisticated than trying on Purim masks. I was particularly struck by the way the exhibition encouraged them to connect their own family histories to the various situations that Jewish families encountered in America, universalizing what might at first seem foreign or unfamiliar. And they were delighted to find that, as a reward for handing in a short survey about the visit, they were sent passes to be used on a future occasion.

Rob, of course, could sell umbrellas in the desert. His boundless enthusiasm made a huge impression, as did his discussion of having a personal mission, which he uses as a guide in addition to the more usual institutional mission on which I put particular emphasis in teaching. I was struck by his discussion about putting significant time into other community organizations as a necessary part of building their interest in NMAJH. I have always thought that it’s important for museum staff to support the entire institutional community, rather than only supporting their own. It is the decent thing to do, and inevitably reflects well on the home institution.

The first time I brought a class to NMAJH it was to meet with Cobi Weissbach, Associate Director of Development. My reaction to that visit was to join the museum. That decision was more than rewarded by the recent opportunity this year’s class had to meet Rob Levin.


By Andrea Kirsh, Director, Minor in Museum Studies, Rutgers, Camden and regular contributor to Artblog.

Lava Bread for Tu B'Shevat

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It’s customary on Tu B’Shevat, Judaism’s new year for trees, to eat a new fruit or to eat from the seven species described in the Bible as being abundant in the land of Israel. With the holiday quickly approaching, I am testing out some of my recipes that feature these sacred fruits; wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives, and dates.  While recipes which include only of these items abound, I only have one concoction which incorporates them all, I call it Lava Bread.  lavabread 2

I invented this bread a few years ago when looking for a way to spruce up my standard challah. I added one more ingredient each week, testing the change on my family. The wheat and barley were easy additions. Whole wheat flour was already in my standard challah. A sprinkle of toasted barley pearls on top added a nice nutty crunch. And while raisins also are a standard in bread, figs, pomegranates, and dates were new to me. The fruity additions were welcomed by my four year old and his father alike. There was a small amount of resistance to the olives, but the salty contradiction to sweetness is better than you might think.

I called it Lava Bread because it consumes everything you add to it, much the way that magma consumes all in its path. While there are many sweet elements, I consider this to be a savory bread, perfect to serve beside a yummy roast chicken and a side of roasted brussels sprouts.

Celebrating this holiday helps remind our family how important trees are to all of us. I read a comic strip the other day that said “It’s too bad trees don’t put out wifi, we would plant them everywhere. Instead, they only produce oxygen.” I think this is a perfect example of how trees and the work they do is taken for granted by so many.
Enjoy!
 

Lava Bread

Put ½ cup of dry barley pearls into a bowl with 1 ½ cups boiling water. Cover and set aside.

Mix 1/4 cup warm (110 degree) water with 1 package yeast and 1 packet of sugar (1 tsp) in a small bowl.

In a large bowl, mix 1 1/4 cups warm water with 3 egg yolks, 1 whole egg, 1/2 c honey, 2 tbsp. veggie oil, and 2 tsp. salt. The warm water will help dissolve the honey. Once this mixture is completely homogenous, add the yeast mixture and stir to combine.

Now mix in 1/2 cup whole wheat flour. I find a wisk works best to ensure this is evenly distributed. Next, add bread flour*, 1 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition until you have added 4- 6 cups (this depends on the humidity that particular day). You will know when you’ve added enough when you can pinch the dough and it doesn’t stick to your fingers.

*Bread flour is higher in protein, which improves the texture of the bread. AP flour will work if you don’t have the Bread flour, ditto for the whole wheat flour.

Dump this mixture out on to a well-floured surface and fill your bowl with warm water.
Put a small pan of water on the stove and bring to a boil.
While you wait for the water to boil, knead dough to incorporate another 1/2 cup of flour. Form into a ball.

Wash your bowl (should be very quick, since you filled it with warm water a little while ago) with hot water and dry well.

Now coat the inside of the bowl with veg oil and place the dough ball inside, turning to coat. Cover the bowl of dough with a tea towel that has been wet with hot water and wrung out.

Place the bowl and the pan of hot water side by side in your oven, with the oven off. While beginning to rise (25 minutes), prep your other mix-ins.

Mix-ins:
1/3 cup dried figs, chopped into 1/2” pieces
1/3 cup raisins
1/3 cup dates, chopped into 1/2” pieces
1/3 cup pitted mixed greek olives, chopped into 1/4” pieces
1/3 cup pomegranate airls

Lavabread 4When the 25 minutes is up, pull back the towel and sprinkle the mix-ins over the dough.
Re-cover and return to the oven for another 25 minutes. During this time, about 15% of the mix-ins will begin to sink in to the dough.

Now pour the dough and mix-ins remaining on top back onto your well-floured board. Be sure to flour your hands well, and then knead 1-2 minutes to incorporate the rest of the mix-ins into the dough. While you’re kneading, re-heat your water. Return dough to bowl with re-warmed and wrung towel, and place it back into the oven with the reheated pan of water.

Let rise 1 hour.

Pour onto floured bowl again and knead 3-5 minutes, adding flour as needed, so dough isn’t too sticky.  Lavabread3

Now you are ready to braid. I like to keep it simple and just do a 6 part weave, but you can do whatever style you like.

Place onto parchment paper and brush with egg wash (1 egg + tblsp water). 

Rise for the last time, 35-40 minutes on the counter. The rising is done when the dough doesn’t bounce back when you touch it, but gets an indention instead.

Heat your oven to 350 degrees about 10 minutes BEFORE you dough is done rising.

Place the challah into the oven for 20 minutes. Pull out and coat again with egg wash. This ensures all the crust is nice and brown. Sprinkle on the barley pearls and a generous pinch of kosher salt. Spin so the side that was in the front of the oven is now in the back of the oven and return to the oven. Cook another 20-25 minutes, or until it sounds hollow when you tap it.

Allow to cool completely, then slice and enjoy!


lavabread 2
 By Ebony Goldsmith, Marketing and Communications Assistant

A Whole Lotta Latkes

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No Thanksgiving table would be complete without sweet potatoes. And latkes (potato pancakes) are key to a successful Hanukkah dinner in our home. So this year, in honor of Thanksgivukkah, I am making Sweet Potato Latkes!

Why are sweet potatoes so important to Thanksgiving? It is probably because they are at their prime this time of year. The beta-carotene rich tubers are full of sugars that haven’t converted to starches yet. And sweet potatoes match the fall leaves perfectly, bringing some of the amazing color from changing of seasons onto your table. They are one symbol of a successful harvest, and something for which to be thankful.

You may already know the symbolism of latkes, but for those of you who don’t know, I encourage you to read this wonderful explanation from the New York Times circa 1982.
The miracle symbolized by the oil in which they are fried, as well as their delicious taste, are two more things for which to be thankful.

There are many recipes for Sweet Potato Latkes out there, but this one finishes with time in the oven, which allows the carbohydrates in the sweet potato to caramelize, adding a nice crunch to the edges and softening the centers into yummy goodness.

Sweet Potato Latkas

Peel and grate about 3 cups of sweet potato. Latkas in bowl
Add ¼ cup matzo meal, two eggs, and 1 tsp kosher salt. Mix well.
Preheat oven to 350.
Form into circles about ½ inch thick and 3 inches wide.
Drop into oil ( ¼ to ½ inch deep) that has been heated to around 375 degrees (hot enough to make a single shred of the mix dance around). I can usually fit 3-5 into the oil at a time.
Cook 2 min on each side, to a nice golden brown.
Place on cookie sheet and put into oven.
Continue frying the rest of the mixture in batches, adding to your cookie sheet.
When the last bunch goes onto the cookie sheet, I usually bake for 5 more minutes.

latkas cooking
Enjoy with applesauce or sour cream as you wish! Do you have any wonderful latke recipes, sweet potato or not, that you’d like to share? If so, please do so here!



 






By Ebony Goldsmith, Marketing and Communications Assistant 

The oil lasted 8 days. The donuts, not so much.

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As I was writing my first ever Thanksgivukkah menu, I realized that I was sorely lacking in the dessert category. In years past, our family has always picked up fresh sufganiyot* from our local kosher bakery in New York City. The tender yeast based puffs of dough were best eaten while still hot, the warm jelly (though cream filled was always my favorite) running down our forearms as we walked home with a box that would be empty by morning. But since we’ve moved to Philly 18 months ago I haven’t yet found any bakeries that will let you buy hot sufganiyot after 7 pm, which is prime donut eating time in our home.

I decided the tradition of eating hot donuts after dark was one that my family would continue on our own, late-night bakery or not. So last year I used my favorite sweet dough recipe with a few tweaks and filled the centers with strawberry jam. I quickly realized why I had been paying $4 per donut at that late-night bakery. Fresh donuts are a ton of work and you end up with a kitchen that looks like your kid is a local sheriff, with jelly in his squirt gun, using flour to dust for prints. But it was all worth it. Almost. Until I realized that I needed parve donuts to serve to friends after dinner.

This definitely threw a wrench in my planning. I thought I would take a look at the ingredients of my “instant” biscuits to get some ideas of how to make my usually dairy dough without all that dairy. Then it hit me: why not just use the biscuit dough?

The results for either recipe below are pretty darn good. I prefer the dairy version and will be serving them for breakfast Thanksgiving morning. The pumpkin addition seemed like an obvious one, but could be swapped for jelly after this once-in-a-lifetime holiday. Let us know which ones you end up making and how they turn out!

*donuts

Parve Pumpkin Cream Sufganiyot
Makes about 20 donuts

For the donuts
2 cans parve ready to bake biscuits (in the dairy section)
Sugar for coating
2 qts Vegetable Oil

For the filling
1 12 oz. can pumpkin
1 12 oz. tub non-dairy whipped topping
¼ cup brown sugar
1 tsp. each nutmeg and cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla

Heat oil in heavy pan over medium heat to 350°, or until a drop of dough floats when dropped in frying
Flatten biscuits to be approx.. 3 inches in diameter
Drop in 2-3 biscuits to hot oil and fry until golden brown on bottom, then flip, and fry until the other side is also golden. About 90 seconds per side.
Remove from oil and put into bowl of sugar, toss to coat. Set aside and allow to cool.
Repeat until all donuts are cooked.

In a large bowl, mix pumpkin, brown sugar and spices until thoroughly incorporated. Fold in whipped topping. Add vanilla and stir 10 more times.

To fill cooled donuts: Snip a corner from a zip-top bag and put in a piping tip. Fill bag with pumpkin cream. Using a small knife, stab each donut horizontally to make an opening just large enough for the piping tip to fit in. Hold the donut with one hand and place the tip into the opening and squeeze the bag with the other hand. Each donut should hold about 2 tablespoons of filling.



Dairy Pumpkin Cream Sufganiyot
Makes about 35 donuts

For the donuts
1 cup whole milk
1 package of yeast
1 tsp. sugar
1 egg yolk
4 tablespoons butter, melted
1 tsp. vanilla
2 2/3 c flour
Another ¼ c sugar

Sugar for coating
2 qts Vegetable Oil

For the filling
1 12 oz. can pumpkin
1 12 oz container whipping cream
½ c powdered sugar
¼ cup brown sugar
1 tsp. each nutmeg and cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla


In a small bowl, heat the milk in the microwave 30 seconds. You want it to be just hot enough that you can feel the heat when you put your pinky in, but not too hot, about 105° to 110°. Add the teaspoon of sugar and stir. Sprinkle the yeast in and set aside. Do not stir. Wait about 5 minutes.

In a big bowl, sift in the flour and the rest of the sugar. Make a volcano shape (a mountain with a crater in the top).

Back to the small bowl, mix in the egg and melted butter to the yeast/milk.

Now pour the contents of the small bowl into the crater in your volcano. Use a wooden spoon and mix until there is no loose flour, about 3 minutes. The dough should be very sticky. Pour out onto a floured board and knead about 3 minutes, adding more flour as necessary to keep the dough from sticking to the board. The dough should be smooth and elastic. Form into a ball.

Rinse and dry your large bowl, then coat the inside with butter. Coat your hands with butter and smooth over your ball of dough, then place it into the buttered bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and set in a warm place. Let rise 1 ½ hours, or until doubled in size.

Punch down the now enormous pillow of dough and knead again for 1 min. Roll dough to approx. ½ inch thick and cut our 3 inch circles. I use a drinking glass to do this. Place the circles onto a cookie sheet and cover again with plastic wrap (this keeps the dough from getting crusty) and allow to rise again, this time for 45 min.

While you wait, place a mixing bowl into the freezer to prep for whipping the cream.

Follow the same directions as above to cook and prep for filling.

punkincreamUsing the bowl from the freezer, whip the cream for 5 minutes, or until soft peaks form. Sift in powdered sugar and continue to whip just until you have stiff peaks, about 3 more minutes. (Be careful not to over whip, or you will end up with sweet butter.)

Mix remaining ingredients, then fold in whipped cream.

Use directions above to fill donuts.

YUM!
 











By Ebony Goldsmith, Marketing and Communications Assistant

Which came first, the pomegranate or the cranberry?

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Cranberry sauce is a staple at most Thanksgiving dinners. And pomegranates are a very important symbol in Judaism. As I was developing this recipe, I couldn’t help but think about all the interesting parallels between cranberries and pomegranates, Thanksgiving and Judaism. Here are a few to mull over as your sauce is cooking.

1) The vibrant magenta color of the cranberry which was present at the first Thanksgiving, interestingly enough, is matched only by the arils of pomegranates, which have been part of the Jewish table for centuries. This color is not found anywhere else in nature.

2) Pomegranates are said to represent fertility, knowledge, learning, and wisdom. Cranberries inspire history, success, and hard-work. These are very similar themes.

3) Cranberries, like Thanksgiving, are native to North America. Pomegranates, like the Jewish people, came to America from across an ocean.

4) Pomegranates on average have 613 arils, which also happens to be the number of commandments in the Torah. There are approx. 27 different chemical compounds which promote good health in each cranberry, which also happens to be the number of amendments to the Constitution.

Do you have any others to add? If so, please share with us in the comments section.

 

Pomegranate Cranberry Sauce


Combine 2 cups pomegranate arils with 16 oz. POM juice and 16 oz. of cranberries in a small sauce pan and bring to a simmer. As the cranberries cook, you will hear them pop, releasing their pectin and one-of-a-kind flavor. cb one


This naturally high pectin concentration will help the sauce to thicken. Cook for about 20 minutes, then check the tartness/sweetness ratio. If you prefer a sweeter sauce, add sugar, ¼ c at a time, until the sauce is to your liking.


cb2Strain through a fine mesh to remove the pomegranate seeds, and return to the pan. If you like chunky sauce, you can add more cranberries at this point.


Cook over low heat until reduced by 25%, about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Now cool. The sauce will thicken as it cools.

Enjoy over pastrami turkey, and the rest of your Thanksgivukkuh dinner!

cbfinished





By Ebony Goldsmith, Marketing and Communications Assistant

Pastrami Turkey

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This year, 2013, will be the last time (for roughly 70,000 years) that the first day of Hanukkah and Thanksgiving coincide. And coincidentally, this will also be the last time (for roughly 70,000 years) that I make Turkey Pastrami!

MMMM, Turkey Pastrami. Who wouldn’t love this combination of the quintessential Thanksgiving bird and the Romanian seasoning considered by many to be a stroke of meat marinating brilliance? No, turkey and juniper berries is not a common combination of flavors, but it is an under-used one! Pastrami was originally created as a way to preserve meat, a common need in the years before refrigeration, including 1621, when the first Thanksgiving was held. This leads me to believe there must have been some form of pastrami at that first Thanksgiving, 392 years ago.

Making Pastrami anything requires a lot of two things. Time and salt.

This recipe is for one boneless turkey breast, but would work just as well with a whole turkey breast, or even a whole turkey! Simply increase the brine and rub quantities proportionately.

First, we brine. Turkey brine
Brining is essential to both traditional Pastrami and traditional turkey, which is one reason this combination works so well together. The salt denatures the proteins, literally causing the muscle fibers to relax and absorb the liquid they are submerged in. Bam -- juicy goodness!

To make your brine:
Place your turkey breast into a container which has a lid.

Place about 2 quarts of cherry soda into a large pot and bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Add ½ cup kosher salt, 12 crushed garlic cloves, 3 inches grated ginger root, 2 tbls. Corriander seeds, 2 tsp. Fennel seeds, and ¼ cup Pickling Seasoning. Mix until sugar is dissolved.

Now chill this yummy goodness. You can also add ice to speed up the process, but not too much, as you don’t want to overdilute. You need this liquid to get as cool as possible. This is when you will use some of that time mentioned above. Submerge the turkey breast with the brine, close the container, and place into the refrigerator. We’re looking to keep this bird cold for 12 hours minimum, 24 hours optimally. This is where you use some more of that time.

While your bird is brining, you can make the rub. The rub is the most important part of Pastrami-ing the turkey. Adding an extra boost of flavor and a nice textural difference, there are many different options for ingredients and their ratios.

Here is the rub I like:
2 tbls. Dry Ground Mustard
2 tbls. Allspice
2 tbls. Fresh Ground Black Pepper
1 tbls. Garlic Powder
2 tbls. Ground Corriander

Mix well and keep dry.

12 (or 24) hours later, prep your smoker. I use my charcoal grill, simply using twice as much charcoal as I usually do, and adding handfuls of soaked cherrywood chips. You can also use a traditional smoker, simply follow the directions which came with your unit.

Remove your breast from the brine and coat with your rub. I like to use a sifter to ensure even coating.
Place the turkey breast into the smoker and close tightly. You will need to cook like this for about 35 minutes per pound, adding more soaked wood chips as they disappear, approx. a handful every 25 minutes.

When your time is up, wrap the breast tightly in foil and allow to cool at least 2 hours.

Now your Pastrami Turkey is ready to be noshed! Either slice it cold for sandwiches, or steam the entire chunk for about 20 min over boiling water, then slice and serve at your festive meal!
Pastrami Turkey

 By Ebony Goldsmith, Marketing and Communications Assistant

Interns' Favorite Objects

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This past summer, NMAJH had a large and diverse intern class, each of whom made unique contributions to the Museum.  All of us have been impacted in some way, shape, or form by the Museum. And as such, each of us also has an artifact that we have connected with. Some of the interns have shared what their favorite objects are and why the objects left impressions on them.

Let’s get started with my favorite object…

 

 

 

Hannah Zuckerman - Marketing & Communications
Favorite Object:  Solidarity Sunday poster in the Soviet Jewry case


"I like the poster because it represents the American Jews in the 1970s who fought for the rights and freedom of Jews in the Soviet Union. Also, my mother was a participant in many of those types of rallies and, cheesy as it may be, when I pass by the poster I feel proud to have a mother who was one of the many young people in the 70s who chose to help the international Jewish community."

 

 

Alida Jekabson – Education
Favorite Object: 1909 Rosh Hashanah card located on the 3rd floorrosh hashanah card  


“I like it because the card wished a happy New Year to the person receiving it, and also illustrates a new beginning for this immigrant family. The imagery is very much of its time, as it represents America as an allegorical figure who welcomes all.”

 

 

Jen Rosen - Academic Liaison
Favorite object: Model of Touro Synagogue located on the 4th floor


“I have been to Touro Synagogue many times, as my family frequently visited Newport on summer trips so it was very exciting to see it reproduced here, and to learn more about how it fits into the early history of Jews in America.”  

 

 

Nora Katz -Education
Favorite object: Irving Berlin piano in the Museum’s Only in America® Gallery/Hall of Fame


“I grew up with his music and songs, and I love seeing an object on which he used to write some of my favorite music.  Irving Berlin is an extremely important part of American history, and his piano is a wonderful symbol of his contributions to our culture.”

   

purim gownLauren Wachspress - Museum Store
Favorite object: Purim gown located on the 4th floor


“I love the room with the festive masks and the fun lighting. These charity balls were thrown by Jewish Americans such a long time ago, shortly after the Civil War. The dress really helps you imagine what those balls would be like.”

 

 

Aaron Madow - Administrations
Favorite Object: Arthur Szyk’s print, “Proclamation of the Establishment of the State of Israel” located on the 2nd floor


“The work encapsulates the combination of the ancient and modern, and militarism and agriculture that so appealed to Zionists. In particular, this shows the imaging of Israelis as brawny men, showing the amplified resonance of the muscular Jew in post-Holocaust Jewish-American culture.” 

 

 

Lauren Shapiro – Curatorial
Favorite object: Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique located on the 2nd floor 


“The author is Jewish and I find its content fascinating. It seems that many notable feminist activists of the 1960s and 70s were Jewish. There was Friedan, of course, but also the artists of Womanhouse, Judy Chicago, Miriam Schapiro, and many more. Influential women like Betty Friedan, Judy Chicago, and Miriam Schapiro make me proud to call myself a Jewish American feminist. When I look at The Feminine Mystique, I think about how the status of women has progressed in many branches of Judaism. I am grateful that so many Jewish communities embrace progress and equality.”    

 

 

  

 

teddy bearKaisha Lourens - Group Services
Favorite object: Helga Weiss’s teddy bear located on the 3rd floor


“I like the teddy bear. It is a symbolic item of Helga Weiss's life which represents a child saved in the Kindertransport. This subject deeply interests and moves me.”

 

 

Cat Cleveland –Curatorial
Favorite Object: Leslie Schaffer’s gum wrapper located on the 2nd floor


“When I was a kid my mother told me about her high school trip to the USSR. Every student was instructed to bring American gum to trade with the Russian kids because the USSR had banned the sale. As a kid, the idea that there were children who couldn’t get Wrigley’s from the store helped me conceptualize the all-encompassing control that the Soviet Union had over people. To me the message of the gum wrapper represents the steps so many took to undermine that suppressive authority and to ultimately challenge both the persecution of Soviet Jewry and the general restrictions of the Soviet Union.”

 

 

 Jacqueline Stevens - Development intern
Favorite Object: Karen Strausfeld’s Bat Mitzvah dress located on the 2nd floor


“I like it because it is a beautiful dress showing the fashion of her time. I like the dress because it tells a story—it is the dress she decided to wear on one of the most important days of her Jewish life. It displays a piece of her personality.”  

 

 

 

 

batAlex Coffey – Curatorial
Favorite Object: Hank Greenberg’s baseball bat located on the concourse level 


“I like it not only because I’m an obsessive baseball fan, but also because he broke barriers for Jewish American baseball players everywhere.”

 

 

Sam Crystal -Curatorial
Favorite object: Gerhart Riegner’s telegram located on the 3rd floor


“Having learned about this telegram and having recently written a research paper discussing the lack of American influence during the Holocaust, it is fascinating to be able to see the actual telegram that warned of Hitler’s plans of extermination.”

 

 

Elliana Rao – Curatorial
Favorite Object: Menu from Hebrew Union College’s Trefa Banquet located on the 4th floor


“As a Reform Jew, I find it really interesting to learn about the movement’s history, and this artifact is an interesting part of that. It also helps me learn more about my own identity, which I think is an important part of the Museum’s mission.”

 

  

 

PassportsJulie Cronan - Education
Favorite object: Passports in the “Dreams of Freedom” gallery on the 3rd floor 


“The wrinkles and tears on the passports give a real sense of the difficult journeys immigrants experienced. Their textures bring the history to life. I am compelled to return again to look at these passports because immigration is still a huge issue today.”

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re interested in the internship program at NMAJH, or know someone who may appreciate the opportunity, please click here.

 

  

 -Hannah Zuckerman

 

 

Please note that some of the objects in our permanent collection rotate on and off view for conservation purposes. Therefore, some of the objects mentioned in this story may not be on view when you visit the Museum. You can always contact Visitor Services at 215.923.3811 x160 to find our whether a specific object will be on view during the time of your planned visit.