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Education

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OVERVIEW

LESSONS

What Does Religious Liberty Look Like?

When Have You Been a "Stranger?" Jewish Immigration to the United States

Why Do People Unite? Rose Schneiderman and the Labor Movement

Are We Responsible for Others? The Movement to Free Soviet Jews

 

Major Funding for Open Book: Discovering American Jewish History Through Objects provided by the Covenant Foundation and the Lucius N. Littauer Foundation. Additional support provided by the Koret Foundation; and the Elizabeth and Alan Shulman Education Fund, supported by the Judy and Fred Wilpon Family Foundation.

Open Book: Discovering American Jewish History Through Objects

Overview

The National Museum of American Jewish of History is pleased to offer Open Book: Discovering American Jewish History Through Objects. Based on material culture from the Museum’s collection, the lessons in this curriculum challenge students to exercise critical thinking and inquiry-based learning skills while exploring the American Jewish experience. In the spirit of traditional Talmudic study, Open Book invites students to approach the study of history in unexpected ways and connect what they learn to their own ideas, experiences, and passions. This open-ended process of discussion and discovery empowers students to see themselves in the larger story of American Jewish life and inspire a sense of pride and connection to their heritage.

Curriculum Overview 
Partnership Learning Overview 

Want to receive advance notice of new Open Book lessons? Enjoying the lessons? Have ideas on how we can improve?
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Please email education@nmajh.org or call (215) 923-3811 x272.

 

Lessons

This page will be updated as more lessons are added. 

What Does Religious Liberty Look Like?

What does religious liberty mean and why is it important? Who is responsible for defending and expanding religious liberty, and how can they do so? How has religious liberty shaped Jewish religion and identity in America both in the past and today? This lesson examines the Museum's historic statue, Religious Liberty, in relation to this important American concept.

Talmud Page
Student Guide
Teacher Guide

Open Book photo
National Educators Institute 2018 teachers learn
about hevruta and the Open Book curriculum.

 

When Have You Been a "Stranger?" Jewish Immigration to the United States

Why did so many immigrants undertake the long and difficult journey, especially at the turn of the 20th century? What choices did they make in order to feel more American? In what ways did they maintain and/or redefine their Jewish identities? Students discuss these topics while making connections between historic immigration, contemporary immigration, and their own stories.

Talmud Page
Student Guide
Teacher Guide

 

Why Do People Unite? Rose Schneiderman and the Labor Movement

How did the American Jewish labor movement develop? What is “mutual aid”? How do the labor unions of the early twentieth century help us understand the meaning of community and civil society? Students discuss unity and individualism in the context of the American Jewish labor movement.

Talmud Page
Student Guide
Teacher Guide

 

Are We Responsible for Others? The Movement to Free Soviet Jews

Who is responsible for starting and carrying out a protest? How do we make decisions about our responsibilities to others? Students learn about one of the most successful human rights campaigns in recent history while considering their own abilities to create positive change in the world.

Talmud Page
Student Guide
Teacher Guide